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Baked KETOghetti || a spaghetti bake without all the carbs

Million Dollar KETOghetti Bake

Baked Million Dollar ‘Spaghetti‘ is creamy with a melty cheese center, topped with meat sauce and extra bubbly cheese. This yummy baked ‘spaghetti‘ casserole will be requested again and again for potlucks and family gatherings.
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Balsamic Avocado Toast || dimpledkitchen.com

Balsamic Avocado Toast

Pretty, versatile, and delicious!

90 second bread recipe. Cut in half and toasted in a pan with butter.

1/2 avocado
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp onion powder
1/2 tsp olive oil
5 cherry tomatoes
1 Tbs balsamic vinegar
1 green onion sliced
Red pepper flakes, Salt, and pepper to taste

Mix avocado, olive oil, garlic and onion powder, salt, pepper, red pepper flakes and mash.

Top toasted 90 second bread, garnish with tomatoes and onions. Drizzle with Balsamic.

Get creative add mozzerella, fresh basil, red peppers or top with an egg!

Loaded Baked Cauliflower || dimpledkitchen.com

Loaded Baked Cauliflower

Super easy, delicious and won’t leave you bloated.

1 medium head cauliflower, cut small pieces
1 tablespoon avocado oil
pink himalayan salt
4 slices bacon (uncooked), chopped
1 green onion, diced (extra to garnish)
1 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese

Preheat oven to 400 degrees and cover a sheet pan with parchment paper.
Toss cauliflower with avocado oil and spread on sheet pan. Sprinkle with salt. Add bacon and green onion to pan.
Bake for 25 minutes.
Take out of oven and add cheese, bake 5 more minutes.
Garnish with more green onion.

Eggplant Pizza || dimpledkitchen.com

Caprese Eggplant Pizza

Don’t wanna bother with Fathead dough? Try these alternative mini personal pizzas instead!

These eggplant pizzas are really easy to make, you simply slice the eggplant and roast or grill the slices until the eggplant just starts to turn tender, top it, and then bake them until the cheese gets all melty. Mmmm, I’m drooling.

Don’t skip sweating the eggplant. The salt removes excess moisture; you will see beads of moisture sweating from the eggplant as it sits. … Since the eggplant has less moisture in it, it is able to soak up the oils used when cooking. The result is a more tender, less bitter, and tastier eggplant.
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Blackberry Lemon Fatbombs || dimpledkitchen.com

Blackberry Lemon Fat Bomb

Why Fat bombs? Fat bombs are great when you want to kick the junk food and sugar cravings and stay full longer. Plus they are quick and easy to make. Blackberries can be your best friend on a keto diet. They are one of the lowest carb fruits so you can still enjoy them without feeling guilty.
Protein often turns to sugar on a low carb diet and can stall weight loss due to the gluconeogenesis process. Eating enough fat will keep you full, and allow your body to burn off the excess fat it already has.
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#atozchallenge - Learn to Cook Online

Learning to Cook… Online?

Almost everything is available to do virtually now, including learning how to cook. There are several accredited courses you can take online that will make you a chef! One of the primary benefits of online education is that it provides flexible learning on a schedule that can fit your busy home and work life.

As we move into a more technological world, more institutions are trading in the classroom for the world wide web, and their degree programs are following them. Culinary schools are no different. Online culinary schools offer all the training you would receive if you practiced at a physical location, but takes away much of the stress. Working online means that your current job that pays your bills will not suffer as you earn your culinary degree that will lead you to a career.
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#atozchallenge - Kids in the Kitchen

Kids in the Kitchen

Children and kitchens can sometimes seem to be oil and water, but the only way they’ll learn to cook is by joining you in the kitchen. When children grow into adulthood, they eventually have to rely on themselves for everything, including feeding. Without cooking skills, they will be tempted by drive-thrus, freezer meals, and other less savory eating habits.

Helping in the kitchen builds confidence and early skills of independence. Most kids feel proud and important when they help prepare food. Sharing in family tasks helps them feel that they belong in the family. Children are natural kitchen helpers. They like to share simple tasks of food shopping and picking foods for meals. They enjoy preparing and serving food to the family.

When you start bringing the kids into the kitchen at a young age, they learn that real food is healthful–and made at home. Knowing how to cook wholesome food is a great way to combat obesity, lifestyle diseases and unhealthy habits. Studies have shown that kids who help cook are more likely to try new foods–usually healthier ones. Letting children be in control of a part of the meal, even by allowing them to choose whether you eat carrots or peas for dinner, can help reduce squabbles over eating healthful foods. Making small changes in your cooking routine and trying kid-friendly recipes helps you work little ones into your dinner prep.

Kid Kitchen Safety

  • Always wash hands before cooking and after handling raw meat, eggs, or poultry. This is a great time to teach your kids about food safety!
  • Never use the same knife, plate or utensil on raw and cooked food, and use one cutting board for meat and another for vegetables.
  • Use a clean spoon or fork each time you taste a dish, and never stick your fingers in food you’ll be serving to others.
  • When cooking on the stove top, turn all pot and pan handles toward the back of the stove to help prevent a child’s arm or head from knocking it over.
  • Wear aprons, roll up sleeves and tie hair back to reduce messes, spills and the risk of fire.
  • Teaching proper cutting skills is important. Begin with a plastic knife and show kids how to cut away from their bodies.
  • Keep a sturdy stool nearby so your child can easy reach counters.
  • Keep oven mitts or hot pads handy at all times. A handle that feels lukewarm to you may be too hot for a youngster.
    If somebody does get burned, run it under cold water immediately. Do not place butter or oil on a burn. Consult a doctor if you are uncertain about the severity of the injury.
  • Don’t assume your children know how to operate kitchen appliances and utensils. When they’re first learning to use can openers, vegetable peelers, and eventually blenders or mixers, make sure to walk through safe tool use step-by-step.

Now that your kitchen is safe, call in the kid and get to the fun stuff! It’s best to set up an area that your children can call their own. If you’re in a hurry, this tactic contains the mess, and it also makes them feel special while cooking.

Age Appropriate Tasks

At 2 years:

• Wipe tables
• Hand items to adult to put away (such as after grocery shopping)
• Place things in trash
• Tear lettuce or greens
• Help “read” a cookbook by turning the pages
• Make “faces” out of pieces of fruits and vegetables
• Rinse vegetables or fruits
• Snap green beans

At 3 years: All that a 2-year-old can do, plus:

• Add ingredients
• Talk about cooking
• Scoop or mash potatoes
• Squeeze citrus fruits
• Stir pancake batter
• Knead and shape dough
• Name and count foods
• Help assemble a pizza

At 4 years: All that a 3-year-old can do, plus:

• Peel eggs and some fruits, such as oranges and bananas
• Set the table
• Crack eggs
• Help measure dry ingredients
• Help make sandwiches and tossed salads

At 5 years: All that a 4-year-old can do, plus:

• Measure liquids
• Cut soft fruits with a dull knife
• Use an egg beater

Before calling your preschooler into the kitchen with you, gather and prep all ingredients (except those you want your child to help with). Do any chopping or big measuring beforehand, and then set items out in the order the recipe calls for. This will help eliminate those “No, not yet!” moments that just frustrate you both.Your little ones are bound to spill while doing their tasks, so have paper towels and sponges at the ready, and if youre particularly worried, spread newspaper over the counter, table, or floor to make cleanup easy.

[themify_box style=”light-green note rounded” ]Make sure your little chef knows that a cook’s job isn’t done when the timer dings. Cleanup is just as important as cooking. Have your kids wipe counters, pile dishes, toss waste or put away ingredients after you’re done assembling your meal or snack.[/themify_box]

But did you also know that cooking gives preschoolers an early grounding in science, math, language, art, and even reading? The kitchen offers abundant lessons in basic chemistry—discovering how certain ingredients combine, react, and change as they cook —as well as arithmetic, since ingredient lists are nothing if not a study in amounts and fractions. Getting your young one to describe what she sees, tastes, and feels feeds her vocabulary, and exposing kids to food’s myriad colors and textures provides them with a whole new creative palette —and palate. Plus, reading through a recipe with your child helps him learn how to follow words from left to right, while beginning to distinguish numbers from letters. And fine-motor skills are enhanced when little fingers tear, stir, and pour.

 

Let them be creative

Set out three or four healthy foods, and let your kids make a new snack or sandwich from them. Use foods your children can eat without choking.

Start with:
• A new kind of bread (whole grain or rye)
• Whole grain crackers or graham crackers
• Mini rice cakes or popcorn cakes
• Small bagels
• Small pieces of whole-wheat pita bread
Spreads could include:
• Fat-free or low-fat cream cheese or cheese spread
• Fat-free or low-fat peanut butter
• Bean dip
• Jelly with no sugar added
Toppings could include:
• Slices of apple or banana
• Raisins or other dried fruit
• Strawberries
• Slices of cucumber or squash
• Cherry tomatoes cut in small pieces
#atozchallenge - Ice Cream Aisle

Ice Cream Aisle Explained

There are many commercial brands of ice cream and frozen desserts that can be great substitutes if you don’t have the time or desire to make your own. Many supermarkets carry a variety of gourmet ice cream, sorbet and gelato. Many of these interesting flavors can even provide inspiration for homemade frozen desserts.
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#atozchallenge - High Altitude Cooking

High-Altitude Cooking

What’s the big deal with High Altitude? The change of air pressure makes things in the kitchen act a bit differently.

At high altitudes:
Air pressure is lower, so foods take longer to cook. Temperatures and/or cook times may need to be increased.
Water boils at a lower temperature, so foods prepared with water (such as pastas and soups) may take longer to cook. Temperatures and cook times may need to be increased.
The atmosphere becomes much drier. Moisture quickly evaporates from everything.
The air has less oxygen and atmospheric pressure, so cooking takes longer.

Did you know it can take longer to cook eggs at high altitudes? Especially those cooked in boiling water such as poached and hard-cooked eggs. Because water boils at a lower temperature at high altitudes, hard-cooked eggs will take longer to prepare. It will most likely take longer to hard cook eggs at high altitudes than at sea level.

What is considered a high altitude?
Most cookbooks consider 3,000 feet above sea level to be high altitude, although at 2,000 feet above sea level, the boiling temperature of water is 208 °F instead of 212 °F. Most of the western United States (Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming) are wholly or partly at high altitude, however many other states contain mountainous areas that are also well above sea level.

Is cooking affected when using microwaves at high altitudes?
Due to the faster evaporation of liquids at high altitude, microwave cooking may take less time than at sea level. There are exceptions: meat, poultry, pasta, and rice require the maximum cooking time. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions or recipe and microwave for slightly less than the minimum length of time recommended. Add cooking time, if necessary. Use a food thermometer to determine if the safe minimum internal temperature has been reached.

How do high altitudes affect cooking with a slow cooker?
Allow longer cooking times at high altitudes. Do not remove the lid from the slow cooker; it can take 20 minutes or longer for the lost steam and heat to be regained. It may be helpful to place aluminum foil on top of the foods being cooked in a slow cooker and under the lid. The aluminum foil will reflect the heat downward into the food. Use a food thermometer to ensure that all food in the slow cooker has reached a safe temperature of 165 °F.

Is cooking affected when using a pressure cooker at high altitudes?
If your pressure cooker only comes with one weighted gauge, you will need to increase the cooking time to account for the lower cooking temperature at higher altitudes. Be sure to follow the directions that come with the pressure cooker for making altitude adjustments for the type of pressure cooker you are using. If there are no recommendations for altitude adjustment, contact the manufacturer directly.

How should home canning processes be altered?
All home-canned foods should be canned according to USDA or USDA-endorsed recommendations. Low-acid and tomato foods not canned using these methods present a risk of botulism. If there is a possibility that any deviation from the USDA-endorsed methods occurred, boil low-acid and tomato foods in a saucepan before consuming to prevent the risk of botulism. At altitudes below 1,000 feet, boil foods for 10 minutes. Add an additional minute of boiling time for each additional 1,000 feet elevation (for example, at 3,000 feet, boil for 12 minutes).

#atozchallenge - Garbage, Compost, & Spoilage

Garbage, Compost, and Spoilage

A great deal of household garbage is produced in the kitchen. As part of the preparation process, inedible or unappetizing parts of food— peels, seeds, bones, shells, rinds, fat, gristle and stems—are removed for disposal. All sorts of metal, glass, paper, cardboard or plastic packaging is accumulated. After a typical meal, food scraps remain.

Understanding that different types of waste can—and should—be managed differently creates opportunities for reducing the environmental impact of the waste generated in North American kitchens.
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#atozchallenge - Eating Etiquette

Eating Etiquette

Etiquette affects almost every aspect of dining. Dining etiquette rules apply before you ever take your seat and continue after you excuse yourself from the table.
Table manners play an important part in making a favorable impression. They are visible signals of the state of our manners and therefore are essential to professional success. The point of etiquette rules is to make you feel comfortable – not uncomfortable.

“Manners are made up of trivialities of deportment which can be easily learned if one does not happen to know them; manner is personality—the outward manifestation of one’s innate character and attitude toward life…. Etiquette must, if it is to be of more than trifling use, include ethics as well as manners. Certainly what one is, is of far greater importance than what one appears to be.”
— Emily Post

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#A2Z CHALLENGE - Diet Descriptions

Diet Descriptions

People like to eat; but not everyone eats the same way. Some eat a certain way due to health problems, and others are following the latest weight-loss trend. And yet others follow a lifestyle.

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#A2Z CHALLENGE - Converting Measurements

Converting Measurements

It doesn’t matter whether you’re increasing a recipe or decreasing it — the procedure for adjusting the ingredient quantities for a different number of portions is the same. We call this scaling a recipe. When scaling a recipe it’s important to know how to convert back and forth between different measurements.
The first thing you need to do is calculate your conversion factor, which is a number you’re going to use to convert all the quantities. There’s a tiny bit of math involved, but it’s OK to use a calculator — that’s what they’re there for!
To find your conversion factor, simply divide the desired number of servings by the original number of servings. The resulting number is your conversion factor.
Keep in mind; some ingredients will have a ‘weight’ or percentage of importance in scaling, and so will need to be adjusted differently.
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#A2Z CHALLENGE - Bar Stocking Basics

Beverage List for a Full Bar

There is of course no ‘initial fix’ to a fully stocked bar. It is an ongoing process requiring the addition of certain liquors etc. at a time when there becomes a demand for them.

Most or all of the ingredients below are considered essential bar-stock, and should act only as a foundation to a well stocked bar.

Keep in mind, some of these can be skipped if you or your ‘patrons’ (Read: drinkking buddies) don’t like them. But it’s always fun to have some room to experiment.
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Abbreviations Used in Recipes

Cooking can be complicated.  All the different acronyms can make you feel like it’s a different language or looking at a military brief.

Abbreviation Measurement
amt, amt. Amount
approx, approx. Approximately
bch, bch., bn, bn. Bunch
blk, blk. Black
BP, B.P Baking powder
btl, btl. Bottle
bu, bu., bush, bush. Bushel
C, C., c, c. Cup
c/l Centiliter
cn, cn. Can
ctn, ctn. Carton
cu, cu. Cubic
da/l, di/l Deciliter
db, d.b Double broiler
deg, deg. Degrees
DF Dairy-free
doz, doz. Dozen
dp, dp. Drop
ds, ds. Dash
ea, ea. Each
EF Egg-free
env, env. Envelope
fg, f.g Few grains
fl, fl. Fluid
fl oz, fl. oz. Fluid ounce
gal Gallon
g, g. gm, gm., gr, gr. Gram
gms, gms. Gram
Gal, Gal., gal, gal. Gallon
Gals, Gals., gals, gals. Gallons
GF Gluten-free
h/l Hectoliter
hr, hr. Hour
k, k., kg, kg. Kilogram
kgs, kgs. Kilograms
k/l Kiloliter
L, L., l, l. Liter
lb, # Pound
lbs Pounds
lg, lg., lge, lge. Large
liq, liq. Liquid
med, med., md, md. Medium
mg, mg. Milligram
mL, ml, ml., m/l Milliliter
min, min. Minute
mod, mod. Moderate
Opt, Opt., opt, opt. Optional
OZ, oz, oz. Ounce
ozs, ozs. Ounces
pk, pk. Peck
pkg, pkg. Package
pkt, pkt. Packet
pn, pn. Pinch
pt, pt. Pint
qt, qt. Quart
qts, qts. Quarts
sec, sec. Second
sm, sm. Small
SoF Soy-free
spk, spk. Speck
sq, sq. Square
SuF Sugar-free
T, T., TB, TB., Tbl, Tbl., Tblsp, Tblps., tb, tb., tbl, tbl., tbsp, tbsp., tblsp, tblsp. Tablespoon
t, t., ts, ts. tsp, tsp. Teaspoon
veg, veg. Vegetable
VG Vegetarian
VN Vegan
vol, vol. Volume
WF Wheat-free

“1 Cup Flour, Sifted” is not the same as “1 Cup Sifted Flour.” When sifting you change the volume of the ingredients. “1 Cup Flour, Sifted” means to sift the flour after measuring it. “1 Cup Sifted Flour” means to add one cup of flour that was measured from already sifted flour. The same is true of measuring chopped ingredients (1 Cup Nuts, Chopped means chop the nuts after measuring.)

When weighing water based ingredients (water based, i.e. butter, milk, yogurt etc) 1 Cup is the equivalent of 8oz. Dry ingredients weight is not consistent because of the volume of air in the ingredients.

Bloglovin launched in November 2007 with the purpose of helping anyone to read all their favorite blogs in one place.

I’m not sure how you read all of your other favorite blogs. It may be through an e-mail subscription, Facebook or just visiting every day (What happens when your list of favorite blogs gets too long?!). But if you follow along with Google Reader – things are a changin’. {And if you’ve never used a blog reader, then you’re going to love this!} Bloglovin’ is an easy-to-use RSS reader for all the blogs you follow, provided that they have an RSS feed. It is a site that allows you to follow other blogs (mine included),share and post if you have a blog as well. It is a great tool to help with getting a blog noticed and followed and it gives you the ability to find new and interesting things, especially to read and start discussions. It even can lead to making new friends and collaborations. They make it so easy to manage the blogs you read in your browser, or on your mobile device.

Once signed up, you’re greeted with a clean and simple UI, a ‘blogs’ link and a search field to start adding sites. You can start browsing blogs via the categorised database or you can head straight to search and type “the next web” or “startups” for example. Click the site name to see a profile page with recent posts, basic info about the site, how many subscribers it has, its rank, category and related sites. If you’re ready to subscribe, simply click “follow” and you’re all set.

You can follow Dimpled Kitchen on Bloglovin!
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Hi! So glad you found us!

My website was created as a resource for anyone who is interested in good food, new drinks, some how-to, and every day cooking in particular. I create step by step recipes that anyone can follow. Recipes here cover all types of cuisine from all around the world and local specialties from many different regions. There are recipes for all occasions, including holiday traditions, party food, kid approved snacks, picnic food, freezer meals, and formal dining.
I have been collecting recipes for over 10 years; and it’s time to share. Physical cards, cookbooks, pins, printed blogs, you name it; I’ve saved my favorites.

I love comments, and hope that you will enjoy your visit!